megablaziken:

Pokémon center in Tokyo :3

(via everybodylovespokemon)

xysciences:

How the moon would have appeared on a young Earth, just after formation. 
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

xysciences:

How the moon would have appeared on a young Earth, just after formation. 

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

(via classicallyforbiddenregions)

bluebandanajake:

MEGA. SWAMPERT.
YEEEESSSSS~

bluebandanajake:

MEGA. SWAMPERT.

YEEEESSSSS~

(via retrogamingblog)

diabolicalillumination:

NGC 4258 (M106): Galactic Pyrotechnics On Display
A new composite of NGC 4258 features X-rays from Chandra (blue), radio waves from the VLA (purple), optical data from Hubble (yellow and blue), and infrared with Spitzer (red).
NGC 4258 is well known to astronomers for having “anomalous” arms that are not aligned with the plane of the galaxy, but rather intersect with it.
Researchers are trying to understand how the giant black hole in the center of NGC 4258 is affecting the rest of the galaxy.
NGC 4258, also known as Messier 106, is located about 23 million light years from Earth.

A galaxy about 23 million light years away is the site of impressive, ongoing, fireworks. Rather than paper, powder, and fire, this galactic light show involves a giant black hole, shock waves, and vast reservoirs of gas.
This galactic fireworks display is taking place in NGC 4258 (also known as M106), a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way. This galaxy is famous, however, for something that our Galaxy doesn’t have - two extra spiral arms that glow in X-ray, optical, and radio light. These features, or anomalous arms, are not aligned with the plane of the galaxy, but instead intersect with it.
The anomalous arms are seen in this new composite image of NGC 4258, where X-rays from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory are blue, radio data from the NSF’s Karl Jansky Very Large Array are purple, optical data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope are yellow and blue, and infrared data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope are red.
A new study of these anomalous arms made with Spitzer shows that shock waves, similar to sonic booms from supersonic planes, are heating large amounts of gas - equivalent to about 10 million Suns. What is generating these shock waves? Radio data shows that the supermassive black hole at the center of NGC 4258 is producing powerful jets of high-energy particles. Researchers thinkthat these jets strike the disk of the galaxy and generate shock waves. These shock waves, in turn, heat some of the gas - composed mainly of hydrogen molecules - to thousands of degrees. As shown in our additional, composite image, part of the evidence for this heating process comes from the similarity in location between the hydrogen and X-ray emission, both thought to be caused by shocks, and the radio jets.
Continue Reading

diabolicalillumination:

NGC 4258 (M106): Galactic Pyrotechnics On Display
  • A new composite of NGC 4258 features X-rays from Chandra (blue), radio waves from the VLA (purple), optical data from Hubble (yellow and blue), and infrared with Spitzer (red).
  • NGC 4258 is well known to astronomers for having “anomalous” arms that are not aligned with the plane of the galaxy, but rather intersect with it.
  • Researchers are trying to understand how the giant black hole in the center of NGC 4258 is affecting the rest of the galaxy.
  • NGC 4258, also known as Messier 106, is located about 23 million light years from Earth.

A galaxy about 23 million light years away is the site of impressive, ongoing, fireworks. Rather than paper, powder, and fire, this galactic light show involves a giant black hole, shock waves, and vast reservoirs of gas.

This galactic fireworks display is taking place in NGC 4258 (also known as M106), a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way. This galaxy is famous, however, for something that our Galaxy doesn’t have - two extra spiral arms that glow in X-ray, optical, and radio light. These features, or anomalous arms, are not aligned with the plane of the galaxy, but instead intersect with it.

The anomalous arms are seen in this new composite image of NGC 4258, where X-rays from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory are blue, radio data from the NSF’s Karl Jansky Very Large Array are purple, optical data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope are yellow and blue, and infrared data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope are red.

A new study of these anomalous arms made with Spitzer shows that shock waves, similar to sonic booms from supersonic planes, are heating large amounts of gas - equivalent to about 10 million Suns. What is generating these shock waves? Radio data shows that the supermassive black hole at the center of NGC 4258 is producing powerful jets of high-energy particles. Researchers thinkthat these jets strike the disk of the galaxy and generate shock waves. These shock waves, in turn, heat some of the gas - composed mainly of hydrogen molecules - to thousands of degrees. As shown in our additional, composite image, part of the evidence for this heating process comes from the similarity in location between the hydrogen and X-ray emission, both thought to be caused by shocks, and the radio jets.

Continue Reading

(via classicallyforbiddenregions)

thenewenlightenmentage:

NGC 2174
Image Credit: Warren Spreng

thenewenlightenmentage:

NGC 2174

Image Credit: Warren Spreng

(via classicallyforbiddenregions)

scienceyoucanlove:

Reaching a kilometre into the sky, China’s new environmentally friendly skyscrapers will feature pollution-absorbing coatings, vertical gardens, insect hotels, wind turbines and solar cells. They’ll clean the surrounding water and provide sustainable power to neighbouring buildings.Read more: bit.ly/1ogTMHX
source 

scienceyoucanlove:

Reaching a kilometre into the sky, China’s new environmentally friendly skyscrapers will feature pollution-absorbing coatings, vertical gardens, insect hotels, wind turbines and solar cells. They’ll clean the surrounding water and provide sustainable power to neighbouring buildings.

Read more: bit.ly/1ogTMHX

source 

(via classicallyforbiddenregions)